GLASS BATTALION

Questions?   I'm Emily. Welcome to my virtual garage, where I hoard all the cool words and pictures I come across.
Here's the Slavic section: как бы.

architectural-review:

Hedvig Skjerdingstad, ‘Copenhagen City Museum – A Matter of Time’, 2014
www.skjerdingstad.com 

architectural-review:

Hedvig Skjerdingstad, ‘Copenhagen City Museum – A Matter of Time’, 2014

www.skjerdingstad.com 

— 2 weeks ago with 392 notes
linguisten:

expectlabs:

Remember the game that made weird robotic noises as it taught you how to spell? Turns out it was not just a toy after all. Learn more about Speak & Spell’s impact on speech recognition in our fifth tech fact installment:
Tech Fact #5: In 1978, Texas Instruments came out with Speak & Spell, an educational toy that was the first commercial product to use Digital Signal Processing. Speak & Spell marked the first time that “the human vocal tract [was] electronically duplicated on a single chip of silicon,” says TI.

The only time I’ve ever seen this thingy was in the movie “E.T.” 

linguisten:

expectlabs:

Remember the game that made weird robotic noises as it taught you how to spell? Turns out it was not just a toy after all. Learn more about Speak & Spell’s impact on speech recognition in our fifth tech fact installment:

Tech Fact #5: In 1978, Texas Instruments came out with Speak & Spell, an educational toy that was the first commercial product to use Digital Signal Processing. Speak & Spell marked the first time that “the human vocal tract [was] electronically duplicated on a single chip of silicon,” says TI.

The only time I’ve ever seen this thingy was in the movie “E.T.” 

— 2 weeks ago with 12 notes
bamnextwave:

Laurie Anderson, from United States: Parts I—IV (ph. Allan Tannenbaum)

bamnextwave:

Laurie Anderson, from United States: Parts I—IV (ph. Allan Tannenbaum)

(via ffactory)

— 3 weeks ago with 89 notes

design-is-fine:

Otl Aicher, artwork for travel campaign for the town Isny, 1976-86. Source

— 3 weeks ago with 269 notes

spacetravelco:

This magnificent New York Times comic by Anders Nilsen explores the past, present, and future of his existence (and ours) through the lens of the cosmic perspective.

(via kqedscience)

— 3 weeks ago with 2068 notes
"When I was young there were beatniks. Hippies. Punks. Gangsters. Now you’re a hacktivist. Which I would probably be if I was 20. Shuttin’ down MasterCard. But there’s no look to that lifestyle! Besides just wearing a bad outfit with bad posture. Has WikiLeaks caused a look? No! I’m mad about that. If your kid comes out of the bedroom and says he just shut down the government, it seems to me he should at least have an outfit for that."

John Waters. (via knivesandglitter)

Love.

(via coffeeandanovel)

(Source: zacheser, via coffeeandanovel)

— 1 month ago with 191 notes
"We have stumbled on the defining ambiguity of human emotional life: we are always caught between authenticity and fakery, always floating in the grey area between involuntary outburst and expedient pretence."
— 1 month ago with 1 note
newyorker:

Sasha Frere-Jones explores “Weird Al” Yankovic’s enduring appeal: http://nyr.kr/1o7cvqS

“With his parodic versions of hit songs, this somehow ageless fifty-four-year-old has become popular not because he is immensely clever—though he can be—but because he embodies how many people feel when confronted with pop music: slightly too old and slightly too square. That feeling never goes away, and neither has Al, who has sold more than twelve million albums since 1979.”

Illustration by by Mr. Bingo.

Good job, Mr. Bingo. 

newyorker:

Sasha Frere-Jones explores “Weird Al” Yankovic’s enduring appeal: http://nyr.kr/1o7cvqS

“With his parodic versions of hit songs, this somehow ageless fifty-four-year-old has become popular not because he is immensely clever—though he can be—but because he embodies how many people feel when confronted with pop music: slightly too old and slightly too square. That feeling never goes away, and neither has Al, who has sold more than twelve million albums since 1979.”

Illustration by by Mr. Bingo.

Good job, Mr. Bingo. 

(Source: newyorker.com)

— 2 months ago with 280 notes