GLASS BATTALION

Questions?   I'm Emily. Welcome to my virtual garage, where I hoard all the cool words and pictures I come across.
Here's the Slavic section: как бы.

"When I was young there were beatniks. Hippies. Punks. Gangsters. Now you’re a hacktivist. Which I would probably be if I was 20. Shuttin’ down MasterCard. But there’s no look to that lifestyle! Besides just wearing a bad outfit with bad posture. Has WikiLeaks caused a look? No! I’m mad about that. If your kid comes out of the bedroom and says he just shut down the government, it seems to me he should at least have an outfit for that."

John Waters. (via knivesandglitter)

Love.

(via coffeeandanovel)

(Source: zacheser, via coffeeandanovel)

— 2 weeks ago with 181 notes
"We have stumbled on the defining ambiguity of human emotional life: we are always caught between authenticity and fakery, always floating in the grey area between involuntary outburst and expedient pretence."
— 2 weeks ago with 1 note
newyorker:

Sasha Frere-Jones explores “Weird Al” Yankovic’s enduring appeal: http://nyr.kr/1o7cvqS

“With his parodic versions of hit songs, this somehow ageless fifty-four-year-old has become popular not because he is immensely clever—though he can be—but because he embodies how many people feel when confronted with pop music: slightly too old and slightly too square. That feeling never goes away, and neither has Al, who has sold more than twelve million albums since 1979.”

Illustration by by Mr. Bingo.

Good job, Mr. Bingo. 

newyorker:

Sasha Frere-Jones explores “Weird Al” Yankovic’s enduring appeal: http://nyr.kr/1o7cvqS

“With his parodic versions of hit songs, this somehow ageless fifty-four-year-old has become popular not because he is immensely clever—though he can be—but because he embodies how many people feel when confronted with pop music: slightly too old and slightly too square. That feeling never goes away, and neither has Al, who has sold more than twelve million albums since 1979.”

Illustration by by Mr. Bingo.

Good job, Mr. Bingo. 

(Source: newyorker.com)

— 1 month ago with 279 notes

asylum-art:

Olivia Knapp Drawings

Olivia Knapp’s intricate hand drawn pen and ink style is influenced by European line engravings of decorative relief and scientific specimens from the 16th and 17th centuries. Her tight cross hatching technique involves long slow and steady curved lines that articulate the surface contours of her subjects; creating supple and tangible imagery. These un-swelled lines incorporate a “line to dot” rendering method as well as an, extremely rare “dot and lozenge” rendering method. “Dot and lozenge” is a practice that was used by 16th century masters, in which a dot is placed in the center of a diamond shape made by a cross hatching pattern, helping to refine the transition between values.

(via coffeeandanovel)

— 1 month ago with 1795 notes
witsradio:

Weekend Longread: Maria Bamford had a great profile in the New York Times Magazine.
"Maria Bamford has a mantra of sorts, and here it is: Do the work. Three words, three syllables. An easy, orderly thing. She tells it to herself when she wakes up in the morning, whether it’s at her bungalow in a middle-class neighborhood on the outskirts of Los Angeles or at a Holiday Inn in Boston or a Marriott in Bloomington, or any of the other highway-side hotels she hits for one night before moving on. Do the work. It’s a stay against paralysis, against the descent of dread. It’s less dramatic than “seize the day!” more affirming than “stop overthinking everything!” It is functional, and that’s what she’s trying to be. Do the work. She repeats it on airplanes, in taxis, on the long walks she takes to calm her nerves before a show. Sometimes she amends it to: Just do the work, the “just” a reminder that she’s not, after all, performing surgery on babies. There’s another, more refined version, too. Do your bits, she’ll tell herself, resigned to the idea that this may always be a struggle. Just do your bits.”

witsradio:

Weekend Longread: Maria Bamford had a great profile in the New York Times Magazine.

"Maria Bamford has a mantra of sorts, and here it is: Do the work. Three words, three syllables. An easy, orderly thing. She tells it to herself when she wakes up in the morning, whether it’s at her bungalow in a middle-class neighborhood on the outskirts of Los Angeles or at a Holiday Inn in Boston or a Marriott in Bloomington, or any of the other highway-side hotels she hits for one night before moving on. Do the work. It’s a stay against paralysis, against the descent of dread. It’s less dramatic than “seize the day!” more affirming than “stop overthinking everything!” It is functional, and that’s what she’s trying to be. Do the work. She repeats it on airplanes, in taxis, on the long walks she takes to calm her nerves before a show. Sometimes she amends it to: Just do the work, the “just” a reminder that she’s not, after all, performing surgery on babies. There’s another, more refined version, too. Do your bits, she’ll tell herself, resigned to the idea that this may always be a struggle. Just do your bits.”

— 2 months ago with 79 notes
"Progress is not an illusion, it happens, but it is slow and invariably disappointing. There is always a new tyrant waiting to take over from the old — generally not quite so bad, but still a tyrant. Consequently two viewpoints are always tenable. The one, how can you improve human nature until you have changed the system? The other, what is the use of changing the system before you have improved human nature? They appeal to different individuals, and they probably show a tendency to alternate in point of time. The moralist and the revolutionary are constantly undermining one another. Marx exploded a hundred tons of dynamite beneath the moralist position, and we are still living in the echo of that tremendous crash. But already, somewhere or other, the sappers are at work and fresh dynamite is being tamped in place to blow Marx at the moon."
George Orwell (via maxistentialist)
— 2 months ago with 123 notes
sciencefriday:

Fireflies are speaking a language of light that scientists still don’t completely understand. 

"Speaking a language of light" is a lovely phrase

sciencefriday:

Fireflies are speaking a language of light that scientists still don’t completely understand

"Speaking a language of light" is a lovely phrase

(via publicradiointernational)

— 2 months ago with 798 notes
"When I pick a story, I’m very much aware of the larger issues that it’s illuminating. But one of the things that I, as a writer, feel strongly about is that nobody is representative. That’s just narrative nonsense. People may be part of a larger story or structure or institution, but they’re still people. Making them representative loses sight of that. Which is why a lot of writing about low-income people makes them into saints, perfect in their suffering."
— 2 months ago
#investigative journalism  #investigative reporting